Feb 26 - Mar 1, 2018
Orange County Convention Center
Orlando, Florida, USA

Waters Symposium.

The Twenty-Ninth James L Waters Symposium on Ambient Ionization.

Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Imaging and Analysis

The Twenty-Ninth Annual Waters symposium will recognize the history, science, and applications of the technologies associated with ambient ionization mass spectrometry for imaging and analysis. This symposium will trace its original developments in the Purdue University laboratories of Professor R. Graham Cooks to the initial commercialization by Prosolia, Inc. to the most recent applications in a wide array of fields from nanotechnology to homeland security to medical operating rooms.

The SACP is extremely pleased to welcome the following innovators:


R. Graham Cooks, Purdue University
Justin Wiseman, Prosolia, Inc.
Pieter Dorrestein, University of California, San Diego
Thalappil Pradeep, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras
Richard N. Zare, Stanford University

VIEW SPEAKER BIOS & ABSTRACTS

Symposium Details

Monday, February 26, 1:30 PM

Room: TBD

Abstracts coming soon

About the 2018 Waters Symposium
The Twenty-Ninth Annual Waters symposium will recognize the history, science, and applications of the technologies associated with Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Imaging and Analysis.

The Twenty-Ninth Annual Waters symposium will recognize the history, science, and applications of the technologies associated with ambient ionization mass spectrometry for imaging and analysis. This symposium will trace its original developments in the Purdue University laboratories of Professor R. Graham Cooks to the initial commercialization by Prosolia, Inc. to the most recent applications in a wide array of fields from nanotechnology to homeland security to medical operating rooms.

Session details coming soon

What is the Waters Symposium?
The James L. Waters Annual Symposium is a unique component of the Pittsburgh Conference Technical Program. Mr. Waters, founder of Waters Associates, Inc. and President of Waters Business Systems, Inc. proposed in 1989 that the Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh (SACP) offer an annual symposium exploring the origin, development, implementation, and commercialization of scientific instrumentation of established and major significance. The objective of the symposium is to recognize researchers and the development and application of instrumentation by preserving the early, and in some cases, more mature history of the important contributions as well as the cooperation between inventors, scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, and marketing organizations.

Symposium Speakers
The SACP is extremely pleased to welcome the following innovators:

R. Graham Cooks – Purdue University

Graham Cooks received Ph. D.s from the University of Natal and Cambridge University, UK. He works with mass spectrometers, their fundamentals and applications. He is a past President of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry and has had the pleasure of working with a hundred Ph. D. students.

Abstract:
DESI:  Concept, Early Developments, Current Trends
This presentation traces the evolution of ambient ionization methods (ionization in the ambient environment without sample preparation). Special emphasis goes to DESI and paper spray ionization. The talk covers the basics of these methods and their applications to pharmaceutical, and clinical analysis. Special emphasis goes to quantitative measurements. Applications of DESI in imaging get special mention as do derivatization reactions which can accompany DESI and which led to the study of accelerated chemical reactions in microdroplets. Recent trends are represented by (i) synthesis at the 10’s mg scale of organic compounds using accelerated droplet reactions and (ii) the ability to screen microtiter plates at rates of 1 well per second.

Justin Wiseman – Prosolia, Inc.

Dr. Justin Wiseman is Chairman, President & CEO of Prosolia, Inc. He also serves on the Board of Directors of Phlebotics, Inc., a medical device start-up company developing automated blood sampling devices for personalized care.

Abstract:
From Discovery to Commercialization: The Journey of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry
Guided by the vision of ambient mass spectrometry that simplifies workflows for molecular analysis, a start-up company – Prosolia, turned a simple graduate student experiment into a commercial enterprise. From the invention of DESI to the present commercial successes and challenges and future opportunities will be described.

Pieter Dorrestein – University of California, San Diego

Pieter Dorrestein is Professor at the University of California – San Diego. He is the Director of the Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center and a Co-Director, Institute for Metabolomics Medicine in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Departments of Pharmacology and Pediatrics. Since his arrival to UCSD in 2006, Prof. Dorrestein has been pioneering the development of mass spectrometry methods to study the chemical ecological crosstalk between populations of microorganisms, including host interactions for agricultural, diagnostic and therapeutic applications. He participated in panels for the white house science and technology office of president on the launch of a national microbiome initiative and has been on panels for the National Academy of Sciences on the Chemistry of the Microbiome. He has co-authored over 220 publications and his work has been featured by the wall street journal, CNN, NY Times, Fox, BBC and hundreds of other news outlets. He has been recognized with several awards; among them are awards from the Beckman foundation, V-foundation in cancer research, EUREKA award for unconventional and enabling research, Hearst Foundation, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturing Association research award and the Abel award in pharmacology.

Abstract:
How To Get Atmospheric Mass Spectrometry from a Niche Tool to use by the General Population
While significant advances have been made in proof-of-principle approaches in atmospheric ionization, they are not yet used by the general population. Yet, and although still far away, the future potential exists that one day every person with a smart toilet, smart mirror and if size of instrumentation can be solved, a smart phone, will perform molecular analysis of any object/sample they want. This information will then be collected and we gain global insight into the molecular diversity that exists in the world and their distributions. When such a routine analysis becomes a reality, we will change what we eat, how we preserve food, how we prepare clothing and construction materials, how we exercise, and how we approach health. But what would a potential roadmap look like to achieve such amazing goal? How do we make the data that is collected more informative? How do we reuse such information to enhance our molecular understanding? How did Google, Amazon or Facebook achieve this for text searches? While it is clear that such capabilities do not yet exist for atmospheric methods, we will highlight the potential with atmospheric ionization experiments from our own laboratories (DESI, NanoDESI, Flow probe and other integrative atmospheric techniques). We will further demonstrate the approach to data reuse, including showcasing that data from non-atmospheric ionization methods and new data analysis strategies, can be used to leverage discoveries with atmospheric ionization. This will be a key requirement to make the information from atmospheric ionization techniques usable for the larger community on a daily basis. This will eventually become as common as a Google search done today but instead of a text search, it will be a simple mass spectrometric scan of a sample without any sample preparation.

Thalappil Pradeep – Indian Institute of Technology, Madras

Thalappil Pradeep is an Institute Professor at IIT Madras, India. His research interests are in molecular and nanoscale materials and he develops instrumentation for such studies. He is also involved in the development of affordable technologies for drinking water purification and they have reached over 8 million people so far. He is a recipient of several national awards and is a Fellow of all the science and engineering academies of India.

Abstract:
Ambient Ion-Based Synthesis of Functional Materials
Development of ambient ionization techniques in the past decade has led to the establishment of a new discipline, namely, synthetic mass spectrometry. This method of synthesis has proven to be more efficient than conventional bulk methods, for a large number of organic reactions. Several studies have demonstrated the creation of compositionally precise nanostructured materials using ions. Synthesis, catalytic activity and large area patterning of bare, uniform noble metal nanoparticles were demonstrated using ambient electrolytic spray. The same methodology can be extended to electrospray deposition of metal ions on surfaces to create uniform nanobrushes composed of oriented one-dimensional silver nanowires (NW) with aspect ratios of 102 – 104. These structures can be grown over large (cm2) areas over conducting surfaces. The materials synthesized can have functional attributes such as catalysis and superhydrophobicity. Such structures may be used to create intense electric fields resulting in the emission of molecular ions. Such ionization occuring even at 1V can help in the minaturization of mass spectrometers. Using such approaches, fragile species such as transition metal complexes can be detected. In the very recent past such ion based methods have been used to make 2D metals. Synthesis methods have been extended to make devices capable of atmospheric water capture.

Richard N. Zare – Stanford University

Richard N. Zare is the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science with an appointment in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Physics (by courtesy), Stanford University. His website: www.stanford.edu/group/Zarelab contains more than you probably want to know about him and the current interests of his research group.

Abstract:
Mass Spectrometry Imaging in the Service of Human Health
Surgical resection (removal) is the main curative option for many solid cancers. The extent of cancer resection is commonly assessed during surgery by histopathologic staining and evaluation of (frozen sections of) the tissue at the specimen margins to verify whether cancer is present. In this lecture I will compare this method to an alternative procedure being developed in my laboratory and several others, called desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging (DESI-MSI). A thin slice of tissue is mounted on an XY translation stage and bombarded with microdroplets that can dissolve lipids and other small-molecule metabolites. The resulting splash of droplets enters a high-resolution mass spectrometer allowing generation of a chemical map, which can be analyzed to distinguish cancer from benign tissue. Results are compared to standard histopathologic determinations and appear to offer the promise of superior performance, both in accuracy and in time.

 

 

 

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