Feb 26 - Mar 1, 2018
Orange County Convention Center
Orlando, FL, USA

2017 Award Recipients

Honoring scientists who have made outstanding contributions to analytical chemistry and applied spectroscopy.

Pittsburgh Spectroscopy Award

Edward I. Solomon
Stanford University
Presentation: Tuesday, March 7, 1:30 PM
Room: W183a

VIEW PREVIOUS RECIPIENTS

Edward I Solomon received his Ph.D. at Princeton, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Ørsted Institute in Denmark and then at Caltech. He was a Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology until 1982, when he joined the faculty at Stanford University, where he is now the Monroe E. Spaght Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science at SLAC. Professor Solomon’s research is in the fields of Physical–Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry with emphasis on the application of a wide range of spectroscopic methods combined with QM calculations to elucidate the electronic structure of transition metal sites and its contribution to physical properties and reactivity.

Symposium Overview

Metal ions play critical roles in biological function and malfunction. The focus of this half day symposium is on the application of transition metal ion centered methods in defining structure/function correlations over metal sites in biology. Emphasis is both on a wide range of spectroscopies and on new structural methods that determine the geometric and electronic structures of metalloenzyme active sites, their reactivities in function and their dynamics in regulation. The techniques presented include spectroscopies extending over ten orders of magnitude in photon energy, single molecular microscopy and ultrafast x-ray crystallography.


Pittsburgh Analytical Chemistry Award

Janusz Pawliszyn
University of Waterloo
Presentation: Tuesday, March 7, 8:30 AM
Room: W183b

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The primary focus of Professor Pawliszyn’s research program is the design of highly automated and integrated instrumentation for the isolation of analytes from complex matrices and the subsequent separation, identification and determination of these species. Currently his research is focusing on elimination of organic solvents from the sample preparation step to facilitate on-site monitoring and in-vivo analysis. Several alternative techniques to solvent extraction are investigated including use of coated fibers, packed needles, membranes and supercritical fluids. Dr. Pawliszyn is exploring application of the computational and modeling techniques to enhance performance of sample preparation, chromatographic separations and detection. The major area of his interest involves the development and application of imaging detection techniques. Professor Pawliszyn has supervised 45 PhD and 64 MS students and he is an author of over 550 scientific publications and a book on Solid Phase Microextraction. His Hirsch Index (H-index) is 85.

Symposium Overview

The symposium will emphasize new development in Analytical Chemistry including sampling, sample preparation, separation and detection techniques including optical spectroscopic and mass spectrometry. The emphasis will be placed on miniaturization and integration of steps facilitating on-site determination. Various areas of applications will be discussed including environmental, food, bioanalytical chemistry and medicine. The Green Chemistry principles will be emphasized.


Pittsburgh Conference Achievement Award

Paul Dauenhauer
University of Minnesota
Presentation: Monday, March 6, 8:30 AM
Room: W183b

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Paul Dauenhauer received a B.S. in chemical engineering and chemistry from the University of Wisconsin 2004, and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2008. His thesis on the reactive flash volatilization of carbohydrates for millisecond reforming of biomass was supervised by Professor Lanny D. Schmidt. From 2008 to 2009, Paul worked as a senior research engineer for the Dow Chemical Company. In 2009, he joined the University of Massachusetts as an assistant professor. He is currently an associate professor at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science.

Pittsburgh Conference Achievement Award

Renã A S Robinson
University of Pittsburgh
Presentation: Monday, March 6, 8:30 AM
Room: W183c

Dr. Renã A. S. Robinson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Robinson is as an emerging leader in the field of proteomics, aging, and Alzheimer’s disease. Recently Chemical and Engineering News awarded her with the 2016 Talented Twelve Award, distinguishing her as one of the world’s brightest young minds in the field of chemistry. She received her B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Louisville and her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from Indiana University. She was both a Lyman T. Johnson and UNCF/Merck Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Kentucky.


Satinder Ahuja Award for Young Investigator in Separation Sciences

Omar K Farha
Northwestern University
Presentation: Wednesday, March 8, 8:30 AM
Room: W183a

Omar K Farha is a research professor of chemistry at Northwestern University, Distinguished Adjunct Professor at King Abdulaziz University, and president of NuMat Technologies. His research accomplishments have been recognized by several awards and honors including the Royal Society of Chemistry “Environment, Sustainability and Energy Division Early Career” Award and an award established by the Department of Chemistry at Northwestern University in his honor: the Omar Farha Award for Research Leadership “awarded for stewardship, cooperation and leadership in the finest pursuit of research in chemistry” and given annually to an outstanding research scientists. His current research spans diverse areas of chemistry and materials science ranging from energy to defense related challenges. Specifically, his research focuses on the rational design of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) and porous-organic polymers for separations, storage, sensing, catalysis, and light harvesting. Prof. Farha has 220 peer-reviewed publications, holds 9 patents, and has been named a “Highly Cited Researcher” in 2014 and 2015 by Thomson Reuters.

Symposium Overview

The Analytical Chemistry Award for Young Investigators in Separation Science was instituted by the Subdivision of Chromatography and Separation Science, a subdivision of the Analytical Division of the American Chemical Society. It was established to recognize and encourage outstanding contributions to the field of separation science by a young chemist or chemical engineer who has earned his or her highest degree within ten years of January 1 of the year of the award. The recipient of the 2017 Award is Omar K. Farha.


Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award

Andres Guttman
Sciex
Presentation: Monday, March 6, 8:30 AM
Room: W183a

András Guttman directs the Horváth Csaba Laboratory of Bioseparation Sciences at the University of Debrecen (Hungary) holding the MTA-PE Lendulet Professorship in Translational Glycomics, also leading the separation applications efforts at SCIEX. His work is focused on the development and application of capillary electrophoresis and CE-MS based glycomics and glycoproteomics analysis for biopharmaceutical, biomedical and cell biology interests. Dr Guttman previously had academic appointments at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) and at the University of Innsbruck (Austria) holding the Marie Curie Chair of the European Commission. His previous industrial affiliations include Novartis (La Jolla, CA), Genetic BioSystems (San Diego, CA), and Beckman Instruments (Fullerton, CA), where he developed high resolution capillary electrophoresis and microfluidics based bioanalytical methods. Professor Guttman has more than 290 scientific publications, wrote 35 book chapters, edited 4 textbooks and holds 23 patents. He is a board member of the Society of Hungarian Academicians in America, past president of the Hungarian Chapter of the American Chemical Society, associate director of CASSS and serves on the editorial boards of numerous international scientific journals. Dr. Guttman graduated from University of Veszprem, Hungary in chemical engineering, where he also received his doctoral degree. He was recognized by the Analytical Chemistry Award of the Hungarian Chemical Society (2000), elected as a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (2004), named as Fulbright Scholar by the Department of State (2012), received the CASSS CE Pharm Award (2013), the Arany Janos Medal of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (2014), the Pro Scientia award of University of Pannonia (2014) and the Dennis Gabor Award of the Novofer Foundation (2014).


The Coblentz Society/ABB – Bomem-Michelson Award

Keith Nelson
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Presentation: Tuesday, March 7, 8:30 AM
Room: W183a

Keith Nelson received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Stanford University in 1981, and after a postdoctoral stint at UCLA he joined the faculty at MIT in 1982. He has worked on discovery of new light-matter interactions and their exploitation for spectroscopy and control of coherent acoustic waves, lattice and molecular vibrations, excitons, spins, and their admixtures with light. He has developed novel methods for study of solid-state chemical reactions, crystals near phase transitions, glass-forming liquids, electronic excited-state dynamics, thermal transport, and matter far from equilibrium. He has pioneered tabletop generation of strong terahertz-frequency fields and nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy.

The Coblentz Society – Williams-Wright Award

Slobodan Sasic
SSCI/AMRI
Presentation: Wednesday, March 8, 1:30 PM
Room: W183a

Slobodan Sasic will receive the 2017 Williams-Wright Award. Slobodan Sasic obtained his Ph.D. degree from the University of Belgrade in Serbia. He then worked at Kwansei-Gakuin University (Japan) on various applications of vibrational spectroscopy, chemometrics, 2D correlation spectroscopy, and SERS. Next, at MIT, he worked on a method for non-invasive analysis of glucose based on Raman spectroscopy and multivariate calibration. He then joined Pfizer (and later Vertex) where he specialized in vibrational spectroscopy-based chemical imaging of pharmaceuticals, and on using NIR spectroscopy for monitoring of blending of pharmaceutical materials. Currently at SSCI/AMRI he is using vibrational spectroscopy, chemical imaging, XRPD, and chemometrics for analysis of pharmaceutical solid forms.

Symposium Overview

The Coblentz Society’s Williams-Wright Award is presented annually at Pittcon to an industrial spectroscopist who had made significant contributions to vibrational spectroscopy while working in the industry.


The LCGC Lifetime Achievement in Chromatography Award

Pat Sandra
Research Institute for Chromatography
Presentation: Monday, March 6, 1:30 PM
Room: W183a

The 2017 LCGC Lifetime Achievement Award winner, Pat Sandra, received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 1975 from Ghent University in Belgium and was promoted to Full Professor of Separation Sciences in 1988. In 1986 he founded the Research Institute for Chromatography in Belgium, a center for research and education in chromatography, mass spectrometry, and electrophoresis. He was a visiting professor at the Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands (1991-2000), and at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa (1998-2013). Pat Sandra has co-authored over 550 scientific publications and presented over 300 invited lectures at scientific meetings. He has received numerous international awards including three honorary doctor degrees.

LCGC Emerging Leader in Chromatography Award

Deirdre Cabooter
KU of Leuven
Presentation: Monday, March 6, 3:45 PM
Room: W183a

The 2017 LCGC Emerging Leader in Chromatography Award winner, Deirdre Cabooter received a PhD in Chemical Engineering under Gert Desmet at the Free University of Brussels (VUB) in 2009. After postdoctoral work at the VUB and the Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science of Stellenbosch University, she became a research professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences of the University of Leuven in 2011. Her research interests include the fundamental evaluation of novel supports in chromatography, the analysis of complex samples in diverse applications, retention modeling, and solutions for automated method development. She is currently the main promoter of five PhD students and the co-promoter of two.


The Pittcon Heritage Award

Robert J. Warren
LECO Corporation
Presentation: Sunday, March 5, 4:45 PM
Room: Skyline Ballroom, W375b

Awarded to Robert J. Warren, President Emeritus of LECO Corporation. Mr. Warren served as President of LECO Corporation from 1976 until his retirement in 2016. His integrity, vision, and leadership have been key components to the company’s success for the last 40 years. A driving force behind the diversification of products within the company, it was Mr. Warren’s leadership that moved LECO beyond its trademark carbon determination business and expanded into areas of analysis for the organic, metallographic, and separation science industries.


Ralph N. Adams Award

Robert T Kennedy
University of Michigan
Presentation: Wednesday, March 9, 1:30 PM
Room: W183b

Professor Kennedy is the Willard Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Michigan. Professor Kennedy earned a B.S. in Chemistry at the University of Florida (1984) and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina (1988). Professor Kennedy’s research interests are bioanalytical chemistry and its application to neuroscience, endocrinology, and biotechnology. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and been recognized by numerous awards including the ACS Findeis Award, the McKnight Award for Technical Innovations in Neuroscience, the EAS Separation Science Award, and the Golay Award for Achievements in Chromatography. He is presently Associate Editor of Analytical Chemistry and Chair of the University of Michigan Chemistry Department.

Symposium Overview

The session highlights the broad impact of Robert Kennedy to many areas of bioanalytical chemistry, including advances in separations, small volume measurements and the applications of these approaches to understanding cell to cell communication. Speakers will highlight neuropeptide characterization, microfluidics, electrochemistry for medical devices, single cell measurements, and high throughput assays.


RSC – Joseph Black Award

Dr. Kirsty Penkman
University of York
Presentation: Tuesday, March 7, 1:30 PM
Room: W183b

Kirsty completed her Chemistry degree at the University of Oxford before moving to Newcastle for a PhD in geochemistry. Now a Senior Lecturer in Analytical Chemistry at York, her focus is on the analysis of proteins: their pathways of degradation, methods for their detection, and how these molecules can inform us of an organism’s life and death history. Since her PhD she has been working on a dating method that covers the last 3 million years, a time period critical for our understanding of climate change and human evolution. She runs the NERC-recognised amino acid dating facility (NEaar), and has received prizes from the Quaternary Research Association (2008 Lewis Penny Medal), the Geological Society (2010 Lyell Fund award) and the Leverhulme Trust (2012 Philip Leverhulme Prize).

Symposium Overview

This session is a journey using proteomics to understand the past and present and solve future global challenges. Starting with the analysis of proteins, their degradation processes and how this can be applied to the fields of earth and archaeological sciences. It continues with research focussing on isotope geochemistry/biomarkers as well as looking at the interactions between metals and microbial life using proteomic technologies. Following this is research using mass spectrometry techniques to analyse proteins and solve modern day challenges in bioengineering, genomics and medicine.


SEAC – Charles N. Reilley Award

Juan M. Feliu
University of Alicante
Presentation: Monday, March 6, 1:30 PM
Room: W183b

Juan M. Feliu, University of Alicante, will receive the 2017 SEAC’s Charles N. Reilley Award. He obtained his PhD by the University of Barcelona in 1978. His research interests deal with Surface Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis, aiming to establish relationships between the electrochemical reactivity of metallic electrodes and their surface structure and composition. Juan was Director of the Institute of Electrochemistry of the University of Alicante from 2003 to 2012. He served as President of the International Society of Electrochemistry (2005-2006), is Editor-in Chief of the Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry and received the Brian E. Conway Prize for Physical Electrochemistry in 2008.

Symposium Overview

This session will focus on fundamental aspects of Physical Electrochemistry (Charles N. Reilly Award) and Scanning Electrochemical microscopy, SECM (Royce W. Murray Award). The first part will address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry using single crystals, both bulk and nanoparticles, as a platform to address issues such as adsorption sites and electrocatalysis and their relationship to electrochemical reactivity. The second will deal with novel applications of scanning electrochemical microscopy to the study of electrochemical phenomena, as well as novel methods and architectures of redox flow batteries and related technologies.

SEAC – Royce W. Murray Award

Joaquin Rodriguez-Lopez
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Presentation: Monday, March 6, 3:45 PM
Room: W183b

Joaquin Rodriguez-Lopez, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will receive the 2017 SEAC’s Royce W. Murray Award. He performed undergraduate studies with Prof. Marcelo Videa at Tecnológico de Monterrey in Mexico, obtained a Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin with Allen J. Bard and did postdoctoral work with Héctor D. Abruña in Cornell University. Joaquin’s group combines interests in electroanalytical chemistry and energy materials by developing chemically-sensitive methods for studying ionic and electronic reactivity in polymer nanoparticles, surface nano-features, and ultra-thin electrodes. An emerging investigator, Joaquín aspires to build a dynamic group that creates original concepts for high-performance energy technologies.

Symposium Overview

This session will focus on fundamental aspects of Physical Electrochemistry (Charles N. Reilly Award) and Scanning Electrochemical microscopy, SECM (Royce W. Murray Award). The first part will address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry using single crystals, both bulk and nanoparticles, as a platform to address issues such as adsorption sites and electrocatalysis and their relationship to electrochemical reactivity. The second will deal with novel applications of scanning electrochemical microscopy to the study of electrochemical phenomena, as well as novel methods and architectures of redox flow batteries and related technologies.

 

 

 

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