DUE TO OVERWHELMING DEMAND, STUDENT WORKSHOPS ARE FULL.
Although workshops are full at this time, we invite you to sign up for our waiting list,
as circumstances may change once the new school year begins.

Student Workshops

Experimentation & Discovery

Several hands-on workshops, designed for students in grades 1-6, will lead participants through the exciting process of experimentation and discovery. Workshops will take place the week of October 22, 2018, at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

The best part? There’s no charge to your school for these workshops!

    There is a maximum of 180 students per day. (30 students per workshop)

    PRIMARY (Grades 1-3)
    Monday, Oct. 22 (CLOSED)
    Tuesday, Oct. 23 (CLOSED)
    INTERMEDIATE (Grades 4-6)
    Wednesday, Oct. 24 (CLOSED)
    Thursday, Oct. 25 (CLOSED)
    Friday, Oct. 26 (CLOSED)

Workshop listings and registration will open soon.

Registration closes September 11, 2018.

Primary Workshops Intermediate Workshops Waiting List


WORKSHOP TIMES:
Monday-Friday, 10:00 am until 1:30 pm
(6 workshops, +30 minute lunch break)


SCIENCE WEEK LINKS

Have a Question?


Kerry Holzworth
holzworth@pittcon.org

800-825-3221, x208


Don’t Miss Science Week

October 20-26, 2018

David L. Lawrence
Convention Center

Participation Info
Submittal of an application does not guarantee your space in the event, but we will seek to accommodate as many requests as possible.

You will be notified as to the status of your registration in the next few weeks. An additional email will be sent at a later date containing important information regarding unloading/loading instructions, onsite details and parking information.

  • Be sure to check session availability before making your selections.
  • Spots are filled on a first-come/first-serve basis
  • Students MUST arrive by 9:45 AM.
  • Students MUST be chaperoned by a minimum of one adult for each 10-12 students.

Primary Workshops (Grades 1-3)
    Monday & Tuesday, October 22 & 23, 2018
Polymer or Monomer
Presenter: Shawn Miller
Lab Ratz Science Inc.

Students use polymer crystals to learn about monomeric proteins in molecules. A lot of mixing and color changes acquire while students experiment with these polymers. They will experiment with several different polymers to create different liquid viscosity. The program is designed for students in grades 1st-3rd and 4th-8th.

Density: It Floats Your Boat
Presenter: Gina Malczewski
Midland American Chemical Society

Students will study density by making a take-home liquid density column, and they will examine the impact of conditions on density.

It Isn’t Easy Being Green and Having To Find Food
Presenter: Barbara Manner
Duquesne University – retired

As a result of participating in this activity, students will use models to describe and demonstrate an understanding of animal characteristics, food acquisition, predator-prey relationships, and energy flow in a food chain. This will involve students manipulating materials representing a frog tongue and a fly. The lesson will be introduced by reading an appropriate children’s literature book.

Exploring Charges
Presenter: Shawn Miller
Lab Ratz Science Inc.

Exploring Charges- Students learn how positive and negative charges interact with one another. Students experiment with magnets, and electromagnets to learn how they are similar to electrical charges. Students also use electricity to learn about static and currents, as well as what the difference is between an insulator and a conductor.

Bird Adaptations: Which Bird? Which Food?
Presenter: Jonell Kerkhoff
The Pittsburgh Conference

Did you ever wonder why there are so many types of bird beaks? The most important function for a bird beak is feeding, and its beak is shaped according to what a bird eats. You can use the type of beak as one of the characteristics to identify birds.
Another characteristic that can be used to learn more about birds is feet shapes! The shape of the feet reflects the habitat that the bird will be found in and the type of food it might eat.
In this lesson, we will explore the shapes of bird bills and feet to discuss why these adaptations are important for the types of food the birds eats and the habitats the birds live in.

Pittcon Planetarium
Star hopping Through the Night Sky
Presenter: Neal Dando
The Pittsburgh Conference

The program illustrates the night sky and allows students learn about stars, the life of stars and constellations. Students are taught the difference between stars and planets, how to recognize easily visible constellations, how to locate them in the night sky and how to use key constellations as guides to locate others. They will also learn about their historical significance and some of the mythical stories associated with them. We will conduct 30 to 45 minute presentations inside an inflatable dome that can accomodate 30-40 students at a time. We can accomodate wheelchair entry/exit to/from the dome.

Intermediate Workshops (Grades 4-6)
    Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, October 24-26, 2018
Light, Color & Spectroscopy
Presenter: John Varine
The Pittsburgh Conference

Students will be able to view a large and very bright visible spectrum (rainbow?) and develop a method for remembering the colors. The spectrum will be used together with other materials to demonstrate color addition & subtraction and why colors appear the way they do. They will also be introduced to a new concept – spectroscopy as an art form. Later in the session, students will view the beautiful colors and spectra of excited gases and learn how they can be used to identify the gases. They will each receive a pair of “Rainbow Glasses” along with instructions on how best to use them.

Happy Soil – Happy Plants
Presenter: Ron Dumais
HANNA Instruments

Students will learn about how soil quality can affect the health of plants. This will include a brief explanation of how certain measurable soil parameters affect plant health, and then students will then be introduced to a few plants of the same type with different qualities in the soil or growth media. The plants’ health will be discussed and then they will have the opportunity to perform hands on measurements.

Exploring Charges
Presenter: Shawn Miller
Lab Ratz Science Inc.

Exploring Charges- Students learn how positive and negative charges interact with one another. Students experiment with magnets, and electromagnets to learn how they are similar to electrical charges. Students also use electricity to learn about static and currents, as well as what the difference is between an insulator and a conductor.

Electrons on the Move
Presenter: Gina Malczewski
Midland American Chemical Society

Students will learn about the electrical properties of materials, including conductors and non-conductors, and solids electrified by static. They will also electrolyze water using pencil electrodes. There will also be a give-away.

Pittcon Planetarium
Our Solar System and Galaxy
Presenter: Neal Dando
The Pittsburgh Conference

The program illustrates the chemical/physical properties and orbital characteristics of our solar system. Students are taught the difference between stars and planets, the life cycle of stars and how to catch a glimpse of our galaxy in the night sky. They will also learn chemical/physical properties of our sun, the four terrestrial planets, and the four gas planets that comprise our solar system. The students will also learn the difference between asteroid, meteors and comets. We will conduct 30 to 45 minute presentations inside an inflatable dome that can accomodate 30-40 students at a time. We can accomodate wheelchair entry/exit to/from the dome.

A Playful Polymer
Presenter: Dr. Karen Levitt
Duquesne University

Due to their many configurations, Polymers are a part of our daily lives! We use them in countless ways (but students will count them!)! However, students (regardless of their age!) may not know that many of the things they play with are also made out of polymers. In this workshop, inquiring minds will explore the answer to the question, what is the connection between a “Playful Polymer” and the classic book, George Shrinks?

Workshop Reservation Form

Submittal of this web form does not guarantee your space in the event. We will seek to accommodate as many requests as possible.

Reservation Info

Submittal of an application does not guarantee your space in the event, but we will seek to accommodate as many requests as possible.

A confirmation email as to the status of your registration will be sent to your school within 2 weeks of registering.

This email will contain important information regarding bus unloading/loading and parking.

Reservation Guidelines

  • Deadline for reserving your class is Friday, September 11, 2018.
  • Be sure to check session availability before making your selections.
  • Spots are filled on a first-come/first-serve basis
  • Students MUST arrive by 9:45 AM.
  • Students MUST be chaperoned by a minimum of one adult for each 10-12 students.
  • ALL information requested in the reservation form must be provided.
Workshop Availability
PRIMARY (Grades 1-3)
Monday, Oct. 22 (CLOSED)
Tuesday, Oct. 23 (CLOSED)
INTERMEDIATE (Grades 4-6)
Wednesday, Oct. 24 (CLOSED)
Thursday, Oct. 25 (CLOSED)
Friday, Oct. 26 (CLOSED)

DAILY TIMES: 10:00 am until 1:30 pm
(6 workshops +30 minute lunch break)